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The assessment process

When should more than one BASIX certificate be submitted?

Seek consent authority approval if you wish to submit separate BASIX certificates for different parts of a development.

For new dwellings, the applicant must submit with the development application, one BASIX certificate covering all dwellings. However, in some cases, the consent authority (usually the local council) may allow the project to be ‘split’ i.e. accept separate BASIX certificates covering different part of the project.

The applicant must request approval from the consent authority to submit separate BASIX certificates. If the consent authority refuses the applicant’s request, it may ask the consent authority to discuss the matter with the Department.

The types of development for which an applicant may wish to seek approval to submit separate BASIX certificates include:
1.    Subdivision into single 'Torrens title' lots, i.e., where the development: 
o    includes land subdivision into separate lots
o    involves construction of detached single dwellings (class 1 buildings) on those lots, and
o    does not involve any common property or shared services.
2.    Developments involving strata title titles, e.g., residential flat buildings, villa units, multi-dwelling houses, dual occupancy or mixed-use development on land that includes common property, shared services or shared facilities, so long as any common areas and shared services can be apportioned between the different parts covered by each BASIX certificate.
3.    Staged development, i.e. where the development will be built in several separate stages over time, and
4.    large multi-building residential flats, involving several separate residential 'towers' and more than 600 units overall, so long as any common areas and shared services can be apportioned between the different parts covered by each BASIX certificate.

Provided it is acceptable to the consent authority, submitting separate BASIX certificates may provide greater long-term flexibility. For instance, it allows an applicant to obtain part consent for a staged development. It also makes it easier to manage future revisions to the project, as only the certificates for the dwellings affected by the revisions need to be revised. It may also avoid complications if some of the land parcels are on-sold or different sub-contracting builders are used for different parts of the development.